lamps alike

lamplighter

Lamps and little ones
Alike reveal darkened ways
And corners of doubt.
Some name them naive, facile,
For always lighting the way.

Faithful and frauds are
Alike left behind to test
The substance of souls.
By this light we are revealed,
Within and without, the fire.

Leaders and lackeys
Alike are judged on blind faith.
Charge your batteries,
Saints, let your little lights shine.
We will see when He returns.

“Peter asked, “Lord, are you telling this parable to us, or to everyone?” The Lord answered, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom the master puts in charge of his servants to give them their food allowance at the proper time? It will be good for that servant whom the master finds doing so when he returns. Truly I tell you, he will put him in charge of all his possessions. But suppose the servant says to himself, ‘My master is taking a long time in coming,’ and he then begins to beat the other servants, both men and women, and to eat and drink and get drunk. The master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he is not aware of. He will cut him to pieces and assign him a place with the unbelievers. The servant who knows the master’s will and does not get ready or does not do what the master wants will be beaten with many blows. But the one who does not know and does things deserving punishment will be beaten with few blows. From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked.”
Luke 12:41-48

(Liturgical poetry during ordinary time after Pentecost is inspired by the parables of Luke.)

Words for the Church: Ordinary Time
difficult, divine
better
torrents of my making
mine to forgive
now does the earth
when blood
knock
unveil
something fearsome
gold dust prayer

receive

receive

It’s taken years of You
Reversing my fears, of me
Inhaling the tears of a cursed world unhinged,
Lunging in my lungs for each salty breath.
It wasn’t enough to believe in grace once and move on, an honorary member.
I needed to receive grace twice, thrice and forever
Until I knew my need so thoroughly
That only the gifted whole heaven would do,
And I would wait, uplifted soul, to You.

We do not live and move and have our being by the courage of our hearts,
But by the coronary explosion of His,
Who gives and loves and grants us seeing eyes and willing hearts to detonate,
Willing lives to watch and wait.

So body, take a step,
Sing a hymn, take some bread and wine
And live, read some Words,
Get to work, get some sleep and love
And give.
We need these inner rhythms of exhortation to our souls
To combat the sinner schisms of expectations versus reality,
To be made whole.

And so each day
Is a reminder that life itself is grace,
And each day
Is the treasured kind, to be measured at heaven’s pace,
And each day
Is where I find that I am found, and tethered fast to You,
Weathered and broken and blue.

I am a bird perched in persistent song,
Who thirsts for the sky,
Empty and full and true.

gold dust prayer

golddust

Lord, help me to invest well and expand
My interest, collecting fast in banks,
Accounts, and index funds across the land.
(For my rewards program, I give you thanks.)

I thank you for the faith to gather cash,
The happiness you grant through comfort sweet.
I pray for those with little faith to stash,
That with new hope they’d work to earn their keep.

Now let me rest, relax, and donate well
To people I deem worthy, to my cause.
I’m grateful I’ll know heaven sure from hell
By all the golden streets and diamond halls.

As Jesus said, of talents, to increase.
And in the end, my master will be pleased.

And he told them this parable: “The ground of a certain rich man yielded an abundant harvest. He thought to himself, ‘What shall I do? I have no place to store my crops.’ Then he said, ‘This is what I’ll do. I will tear down my barns and build bigger ones, and there I will store my surplus grain. And I’ll say to myself, “You have plenty of grain laid up for many years. Take life easy; eat, drink and be merry.”’ But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life will be demanded from you. Then who will get what you have prepared for yourself?’ This is how it will be with whoever stores up things for themselves but is not rich toward God.” Luke 12:16‭-‬21

(Liturgical poetry during ordinary time after Pentecost is inspired by the parables of Luke.)

Words for the Church: Ordinary Time
difficult, divine
better
torrents of my making
mine to forgive
now does the earth
when blood
knock
unveil
something fearsome

something fearsome

roaches

You used to
Skitter behind the walls,
Litter of mine, dropping
Roaches slipping past me.
With a slap, cast down flat
As fast as can be, by something
Fearsome, more than me.
No vacancy now, the room is full
But empty of tears. Come for me,
Who once had plenty of fears,
Come at me, you demons, you devils,
As fast as can be, and Something
Fearsome, Who’s for me,
Who is and utters Power,
Will dissolve you to dust.

Sputter, glower, all you must,
But strength you’ve only dreamed of
Inhabits length and breadth of this hut
Now. This is Supreme Love.
Here, we are under new ownership,
A thunder You intone, Your lips,
(Like Your fingers: fearsome)
Breathing strength I’ve only dreamed of,
Seething near. Come closer
Insects, your armor is flimsy, and scatter
As chaff. He is far more; simply, He is
Fearsome.
He laughs, and He’s for me,
And utterly more than
You used to
Be, He’s something
Fearsome.

If I drive out demons by the finger of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you. When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own house, his possessions are safe. But when someone stronger attacks and overpowers him, he takes away the armor in which the man trusted and divides up his plunder. Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.
Luke 11:20-‬23

(Liturgical poetry during ordinary time after Pentecost is inspired by the parables of Luke.)

Words for the Church: Ordinary Time
difficult, divine
better
torrents of my making
mine to forgive
now does the earth
when blood
knock

unveil

transfigure

(for Transfiguration Sunday)

Every one of us will eventually be running around naked.
There will be no way to cover our pain, no pretense or fame, no expensive names –
The light there will be so bright that it disclothes us, all of us,
And the fall of us will be mighty and massive: insane.
To what degree will that be awkward for me?
Is nakedness freedom or shame?

It’s valuable (no) important (no) essential – to see
And be seen, for faith is in sight (as in seeing unseen), is in hearing unheard-of things:
belief is obscene!
Such that hiding it seems the most natural way,
Such that He hid Himself for most of the days
He was here, but to several, and then to them all,
Not yet to us. When? Not yet, and then…
My loved ones, He lingers, but still we will know.
And the grace of His lingering is melting like snow.

Sparkle then, sprinkle us, baptize us well
That rising from rivers, and blinking back hell,
You would clothe us all daily in luminous light
And forget, and remember, and hold back the night.
Listen well, saints, His unveiling is nigh,
What once was concealed will soon split the sky.

“No one lights a lamp and hides it in a clay jar or puts it under a bed. Instead, they put it on a stand, so that those who come in can see the light. For there is nothing hidden that will not be disclosed, and nothing concealed that will not be known or brought out into the open. Therefore consider carefully how you listen. Whoever has will be given more; whoever does not have, even what they think they have will be taken from them.”
Luke 8:16‭-‬18

(Liturgical poetry during ordinary time after Pentecost is inspired by the parables of Luke.)

Words for the Church: Ordinary Time
difficult, divine
better
torrents of my making
mine to forgive
now does the earth
when blood
knock